Sacramento residents voice opposition to city’s stormwater system

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WHO ARE AGAINST IMPROVEMENTS. >> HI THIS IS NOT FRIVOLOUS CONCN. JOURNALIST: THEY HAVE EXPERIENCED FLOODS LIKE THESE PHOTOS FROM LAST OCTOBER AND WHAT REMAINS ON THEIR GROUNDS IS DISTURBING. >> WE FOUND IT ON OUR LAWNS. >> THEY FOUND E-COLI AND KOL OR .RMFO >> IT WOULD IMPROVE THE ANGGI STORMATER W SYSTEM, PUMPS AND PIPES, SOME OF WHICH ARE A WORLD OF A CENTURY, BUT SOME SAY IT DOESN’T SOLVE THE PROBLEM. >> IT WAS TIME FOR THE U TOS TO TAKE A STAND AND SPEAK UP. THESE DRESSING MEASURES DO NOT WORK. WE MUST SEPARATE THE SYSTEM. PORERTER: WE TOLD THE CITY. >> IT TAKES RAINWATER RUNOFF AND WILL COMBINE. REPORTER: THE CITY OF SACRAMEONT HAS CONSIDERED SPLITTING THE SYSTEM. >> IT WOHLOS C AT LEAST $2.7 BILLION TO REPLACE AND SEPARATE. REPORTER: THIS WILL MEAN TEARING UP THE STREETS AND SIDEWALKS IN DOWNTOWN SACRAMENTO AND THE LAND PARK AND THERE IS NO ESTIMATED TIME TO COMPLETE. BUT THE GROUP FEELS THAT THIS IS OF THE GREATEST IMPORTANCE. >> THIS IS A HANUM HEALTH PROBLEM AND IT IS HARD TO UNDERSTAND HOW A CITY WANTS TO BE A WORLD CLASS CITY TREJING THROUGH THE SEWERS. GULSTAN: THEY HAVE A FEE THAT WILL BE KKIC IN JULY. 1 IF THE MAJORITY SAYS NO, T

‘Another band-aid’: Sacramento residents voice opposition ahead of deadline to vote on stormwater system repairs

“It’s a bandage, it’s another bandage… it’s a human health problem”

Sacramento residents have until Wednesday to vote in a special stormwater system election to fix what some neighbors have described as a huge problem. Park. However, there have been reports to the city of it creating a backup during storms where sewer contents come out of the sewers, into the street and into neighborhood yards. “Anything you can flush down the toilet, think about it, we found on our lawns,” said Melinda Johnson, a member of the Parkside Neighborhood Group, which protects homes, businesses, local rivers and water sources. water.” For Johnson, she sees the measure as “another band-aid,” explaining that the current stormwater system is a “human health issue.” After the last major storm in October 2021, the Parkside Neighborhood Group hired biologists and chemists to test flooded areas. According to the group, they found E. coli, streptococci and coliforms in their yards, streets and in homes that were flooded. “We have decided that with this initiative coming onto the ballot, it is time for us to take a stand and say no. These band-aid measures are not working; you have to separate the system and separate it once and for all “Part of this stormwater system is what we call a combined sewer system … line in a pipe, and it will combine with sanitary sewer runoff,” said Carlos Eliason of the Sacramento Department of Public Utilities. Streets and sidewalks that would be ripped out. The stormwater system is 100 years old. The measure, which will be voted on Wednesday, March 16, would increase fees paid by owners of industrial, commercial and residential buildings, in order to: Protect the quality of drinking water and supplies Keep toxic chemicals, sewage and human waste out of rivers and streams Prevent sewage and human waste from overflowing onto neighborhood streetsProviding clean, safe water for future droughts and emergenciesReplacing aging and deteriorated pumps that prevent floodingRepairing aging water pipes and infrastructureIf approved, the average single-family home would pay $6 more per month, with larger lots paying up to $10 per month. 30 h This deadline applies whether they are mailed or delivered by hand, ”according to the city. “Some people may confuse this with ‘being mailed by March 16’, which it is not; we must receive them by March 16.”

Sacramento residents have until Wednesday to vote in a special stormwater system election to fix what some neighbors have described as a massive problem.

Currently, the stormwater system works by mixing stormwater with sewage once it rains in parts of downtown, East Sacramento, and Land Park. However, there have been reports to the city of it creating a backup during storms where sewer contents come out of sewers, onto the street and into neighborhood yards.

“Anything you can flush down the toilet, think about it, we found it on our lawns,” said Melinda Johnson, a member of the Parkside Neighborhood Group.

According to a message posted on the city’s website, “The City of Sacramento is considering a potential voting measure to fund repairs, maintenance and upgrades to its aging stormwater system, which protects homes, businesses, local rivers and water sources. »

For Johnson, she sees the measure as “another band-aid”, explaining that the current stormwater system is a “human health concern”.

After the last major storm in October 2021, the Parkside Neighborhood Group hired biologists and chemists to test the flooded areas. According to the group, they found E. coli, streptococci and coliforms in their yards, streets and in flooded homes.

Residents near McKinley Park erected signs opposing the new measure, saying it was a temporary fix to a very real problem.

“We decided that with the arrival of this initiative on the ballot, it was time for us to take a stand and say no. These band-aid measures do not work; you have to separate the system and separate it once and for all,” Johnson said.

KCRA 3 has asked the municipal authorities for a response.

“Part of this stormwater system is what we call a combined sewer system…Essentially it takes the stormwater runoff, down the line into a pipe, and it will combine with the runoff sanitary sewer,” said Carlos Eliason of the Sacramento Department of Utilities.

Eliason explained that the city has explored separating the storm and sewer systems, but the project would cost $2.7 billion and disrupt many streets and sidewalks that would be torn up.

The stormwater network is 100 years old.

The measure, which will be voted on Wednesday, March 16, would increase the fees paid by owners of industrial, commercial and residential buildings, to:

  • Protect the quality and supply of drinking water
  • Keep toxic chemicals, sewage and human waste out of rivers and streams
  • Prevent sewage and human waste from overflowing onto neighborhood streets
  • Provide safe, clean water for future droughts and emergencies
  • Replace aging and deteriorated pumps that prevent flooding
  • Repair aging water pipes and infrastructure

If approved, the average single-family home would pay $6 more per month, with larger lots paying up to $10 per month.

“Bots must be returned no later than March 16 by 4:30 p.m. This deadline applies whether they are mailed or hand-delivered,” according to the city. “Some people may confuse this with ‘being mailed by March 16’, which it is not; we must receive them by March 16.”

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